Q&A

Firstly: Whoa. When I saw my blog views last night I couldn’t believe it! Thank you all so much for viewing my blog and enjoying it! It makes me so happy that many of you found it so useful.

Anyways, I got a few e-mails last night from you guys (thanks so much!) and one of them contained some really good questions! I decided to do a little Q&A post answering them because I think maybe others also have the same questions. The person who asked these questions is going to Busan, so some of the answers are directly about Busan. However you can assume things are similar in the other big cities.

Q: Are there areas where Koreans and expats hang out together?

Language exchanges are a good start. I just put up a post about my favorite language exchange group, MokTalk. There are others around the city as well.

There are many bars and clubs around the city that both Koreans and foreigners hang out at. I’m the worst person to be talking about this. You will hear the phrase “round two” a lot in Korea. After going to dinner with friends, Koreans always suggest “round two”. Round two is usually a bar or suljib (Korean bar).  My kind of round two, on the other hand, is cake and coffee at a coffee shop!!

Anyways, here is the little that I do know. KSU (Kyungsung University), PNU (Pusan National University), Seomyeon, Gwangalli, and Haeundae are the areas where you can find a lot of foreigners and Koreans mixing. Thursday Party is one popular bar that has branches in all of these areas. KSU and Seomyeon have many popular clubs.

Obviously anywhere you go there will be Koreans. If your group is having a great time, they might ask to join!

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MokTalk: Language Exchange in Busan

*Update 4/6/16: MokTalk has moved to a bigger cafe! Check out the updated info below!

While I was studying in Seoul, I participated in two language exchanges. These were both one-on-one, but they were a huge factor in me learning Korean well and becoming more confident in the language. I also met two really amazing people and our “meetings” turned into just opportunities to hang out with a friend, and also practice language. I knew when I returned to Korea that I wanted to participate in more language exchanges.

I have been to two different language exchange meetings in Busan, but MokTalk is my favorite. I’ve been attending MokTalk since I first arrived in Busan, and it was only last night that I realized the meaning of the name. I feel very stupid that it has taken me this long. 목요일 (mok.yo.il) means “Thursday” in Korean. So, mok + talk = Thursday Talk.

Even if you don’t attend MokTalk, there are other language exchange meetings around the city that might be closer to you. I know there is one in Seomyeon and another in PNU. I really recommend language exchange meetings, even if you don’t want to learn another language! They are a great way to meet people! Before attending MokTalk, I didn’t know anyone in Busan. Now, I have an amazing group of friends!

Moktalk

When: Thursdays. 7-9pm

Where: SEA Space Cafe near Kyeongseong University.

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Fee: Order coffee, tea, juice, etc when you walk in. Prices are ~3,500-5,500won. Give the receipt to one of the MokTalk organizers.

Join: Check out MokTalk’s Facebook page for all the latest information about the meetings.

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When you arrive to the meeting, you should order a drink and bring the receipt to a MokTalk organizer. All the MokTalk organizers are super friendly, wonderful people. You will be asked to make a name tag and shown to a seat. People show up at differrent times, so it starts off with everyone at one table, but it eventually grows to a few tables in the cafe. From 7:00-8:00 everyone is speaking primarily English. There is no set topic or guide, you are free to talk about whatever you want with your table.

At 8:00 you are asked to change tables, so that you are able to meet and talk with different people. At this time they also set up language tables based on the native speakers of different languages that show up. At this time I move to the Korean table where there are other foreigners learning Korean. A few native Korean speakers also join the Korean table as well.

At 9:00 the meeting ends and some move on to round two at a nearby bar. Because I don’t live nearby, I usually don’t participate in round two. I’ve gone a few times when I didn’t have school the next day and it’s been really fun both times.

Some language exchange meetings have the “speed-dating” vibe or are just too loud. MokTalk has a more friendly atmosphere and you can actually hear people when they are speaking.

(Credit: both photos are from the MokTalk Facebook page)