How I Pay My Student Loans From Korea

One of the most important things I researched before coming to Korea was how I was going to pay  my student loans every month from abroad. I found the solution… though slightly complicated. It didn’t work out the way I wanted it to at first, but eventually it all got sorted out.

Thanks to another EPIK teacher’s blog (sorry I don’t remember specifically so I can’t link it), I found out that when using Citi Bank both in Korea and the US there is no wire transfer fee.

1. Open a US Citi Bank Account before leaving the US

I did not have a Citi Bank account, so I needed to set one up before I left the country. I went to a local bank and a really nice man helped me set up the best account for my needs.

We settled on an Access Checking Account. As long as I do one of the following each month, I do not have to pay the $10 monthly maintenance fees:
1) Pay 1 bill (this includes my student loan payments)
2) Maintain $1,500 in the account
3) 1 direct deposit Continue reading

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Why I Haven’t Been Blogging

I can’t believe how long it’s been since I last updated. It’s been about 3 months! So, what happened? In short, my life just got crazy busy and I haven’t had the time, energy, or (honestly) the desire to write any blog posts. If you want more details, continue reading!

An EPIK Surprise

Back in maybe December or January my vice principal notified me that a nearby school was looking for my school to share me–the native English speaker–with them. My education district in Busan only has 3 or 4 middle school native English teachers, and I happened to be the closest one. He asked how I felt and I kind of made an “ehhh” face and said, “I’ll do whatever you tell me to do.” His answer was “no”. The topic came up again a few times over the next month but each time everyone said they didn’t want to share me with a second school.

Because my school shrank in numbers between the two school years, we lost 3 classes. Therefore, I lost three teaching hours. In the eyes of the education office, I had plenty of time to spare. My school came up with a plan where I would teach the 1st graders twice a week to increase my hours and make me too busy to go to a second school. Well, it didn’t work.

Exactly 1 week before the start of the new school year, after a whole month of desk warming and preparing lesson plans for my new schedule, a letter arrived from the Office of Education informing me that I would indeed be teaching at two schools now. No one saw that coming. I was pissedContinue reading

Useful Links and Apps for Foreigners in Korea

I have put together a list of websites and apps that I use in Korea and Busan. App links go to iTunes. If you want Android versions, you can google them yourself ^.^

Communication

Kakao Talk (App) (Desktop): Koreans don’t text, they Kakao. Free texting, free calling, free video chatting. The emoticons are also fun (though many you do need to pay for).

Naver Dictionary (App): A dictionary/translator for single words or short phrases. For long translations people use Google Translate (though most often it is just jibberish).

Continue reading

Blog Post Requests

 

I know the new wave of EPIKers are starting to prepare for moving to Korea. I’m sure you all have lots of questions and I want to answer them! Please comment below with any questions or potential blog post ideas that you are interested in!

❤ Natasha